Ringing, Buzzing, or Chirping Sound in Your Ears?

October 18th, 2012 by Deborah Price, Au.D.


Man with ringing in ears

What causes my ears to ring?

About 50 million people in the U.S. and 1 of every 5 people in the world suffer from tinnitus (tin-night-us or tin-i-tus), a bothersome and sometimes debilitating condition that affects the auditory system.

Many things can cause tinnitus, including wax buildup, certain medications, head or neck trauma, tumors on the auditory nerve, jaw problems, and other medical conditions. However, the most common cause of tinnitus is exposure to loud noise. For this reason, hearing loss and tinnitus often go hand-in-hand, and together they can result in a significant decrease in enjoyment of everyday life.

Protection against tinnitus

If you don’t currently suffer from tinnitus, you can protect yourself by wearing hearing protection around loud noise and by asking your doctor if any of your medications have a negative effect on your hearing. If you do suffer from tinnitus, there are a number of things that can be done to help you cope with, and in many cases reduce, the tinnitus that you are experiencing.

Treating tinnitus

Your first step in dealing with tinnitus is to schedule an evaluation with an AudigyCertified™ audiologist. During your appointment, we will go through a 4-step process that will help us identify the cause of your tinnitus, and we will educate you about the therapeutic process necessary to help you gain relief from your tinnitus symptoms.

You can visit our website to find out more about tinnitus, hearing, and our practice at www.hearing-center.com. There is no need to continue dealing with the frustration and annoyance of tinnitus.

 

Deborah Price, Au.D.

About Deborah Price, Au.D.

Dr. Deborah Price is one of the leading audiologists in the nation. She founded Hearing Professional Center in 1983 serving the diagnostic and rehabilitative needs of over 40,000 individuals. Dr. Price served as Chair of the Audiology Foundation of America from 2007 until it closed its door, donating all the assets to the Arizona School of Health Sciences for the establishment of the AFA Institute.